How To Spend Time with Your Loved Ones If Dementia Settles In

Welcome to Irisada’s blog. We focus on solutions for families living with differently abled – loved ones so they can live life to the fullest.

Recently, we’ve been focussing on activities and lifestyle adaptations for elderly citizen’s. Today we’re going to talk about a more sensitive subject: how to spend time with a loved one suffering from dementia.

Warning Signs That Your Independent Elder Needs More Help

Many families struggle with this development. When an active and independent loved one shows signs of no longer being able to take care of themselves, it’s incredibly difficult to determine just how much help they need. And understandably, most elders want to stay in their own home as long as possible, which makes the subject even more sensitive.

It can be hard to figure out exactly how much help your elder needs. (photo credit: Pixabay)

Generally speaking, there’s no absolute rule, especially if your elder doesn’t suffer from a specific medical condition. We found this great guide, (provide your email to download) by Leslie Kernisan, a practising geriatrician. It helps you evaluate what part of your elder’s lifestyle or health might be problematic, and identify suitable courses of action, as well as conversation starters. Thus you can really talk about solutions to specific questions, rather than just tell your loved one that you are “worried”, which might sound too vague from their standpoint.

Calibrating Activities for Elders With Dementia Like Conditions

The important and over-arching rule is to find failure-free activities as satisfaction stems more easily from doing than from an intended outcome. Just because a person has aged and changed, doesn’t mean they don’t need to cultivate their sense of self-worth. In turn, spending time in engaging and satisfying activities limits anxiety, stress and sundowning behaviour. The virtuous cycle helps with everyday life and might even slow the progress of the illness.

Before moving on to examples of activities for people with dementia-like conditions, we’d like to share this Ted Talk by Alanna Shaikh. We like the empathetic and relatable way Shaikh explains dementia (in this case Alzheimer’s disease).

 

What stands out is how many activities have been struck off the list, and the need to find extremely simple, hands-on alternatives.

Examples of No-Fail, Fun Activities For People with Dementia-Like Conditions

Everyone is different, so you’ll want to calibrate these activities according to your elder’s tastes.

In the early stages, your elder might still enjoy playing cards, like memory games or solitaire. They might enjoy Hua Hee, a memory card game specially developed for ageing family members. If your elder still wants to play their regular games, cards with bigger numbers will be easier to read.

An example of a memory box (photo credit: Home Instead)

If they still like looking at old souvenirs or special mementoes, you could make a memory box to rummage through or try this talking photo album, which helps your loved ones recall the memories in the pictures. Jewellery boxes also often have similar functions, though sometimes the memories – or lack thereof – can be overwhelming. You’ll also find that sensory activities help bring back memories, by activating their sense of smell or touch.

Some elders derive satisfaction from activities resembling household chores. You might find they love sorting cutlery, or folding towels and clothes. They will feel like they are doing something worthwhile. And at the same time, they can’t really fail these activities. Some will even enjoy cutting out coupons, for example. This means they have to be safe with scissors, so keep an eye out!

Remember, you can stay creative with your activities: make a (simple) puzzle that represents a special place, set up arts and crafts activities, create themed boxes with fabrics or materials. You know your elder best!

More links and ideas here:
Please follow and like us:

New Year, Same Promise, Exciting Developments

The old year is closing, the new one is coming. We thought now would be the right time to reflect on 2017 and give you a taste of what is yet to come. As you know, our goal is to become the go-to platform for families in search of solutions adapted to their developmental differences. We’ll continue to pursue this goal.

happy-new-year

Photo credit: Aaron Burden

2017: Developing Community and Awareness

Those of you who’ve followed us from the beginning know Irisada is still young. As the online platform grew, we also wanted to get to know our community better. So just under two years ago, we opened a Facebook page.  This year we worked on strengthening our community of followers and pursuing socially responsible goals.

We held several fun giveaways, including Hua Hee card games to help fight against dementia and Senseez Pillows for kids with sensory needs. We also held a fundraiser to give back to the community when we launched T-Jacket (a vest that helps autistic children relax by simulating a hug) on Irisada.

banner-03

Part of our aim is also to build awareness around a wide range of conditions and explore the kinds of products and anecdotal tips that help families live fuller lives. Over the past six months, we focused on different conditions, striving to share tips from other parents in similar situations. Here’s a quick recap in case you’ve missed some of them:

2018: Same Promise, Exciting Developments

With already more than 300 products available for a range of conditions and abilities, we’ll be continuing to find the best solutions for your families. We’ll expand product ranges and cater to new conditions, including those linked to mobility and the elderly, to give you more choice.

banner-01

As for our community, we’ll be actively discussing specific points in our specialised Facebook groups. One such group is already running (The Discussion Group for Solutions and Tools for Special Needs), feel free to join, and we welcome suggestions for groups you’d like to see set up.

In terms of blog articles, we’ll be delving deeper into some of the conditions already mentioned, reach out to us if you have specific topic suggestions.

We look forward to the coming year with you. Keep following us on Facebook and Instagram. Get in touch with comments and suggestions. And of course, send us product ideas or reviews. You are the reason Irisada exists, you’re part of our story!

Last but not least: Happy New Year and thanks for following our adventures!

Please follow and like us:

Turning Hospital Fears into Positive Experiences

This series is designed to help parents manage specific aspects of bringing up a child with a different learning path. We’ll be looking at what parents, specialists and people with diabetes have to say about living with the condition.

We’d initially planned to cover the difficulties faced by diabetic children learning how to use needles on a daily basis. But kids with many conditions face a common fear of medical setting. So we spoke to Esther Wang, an entrepreneur and inventor, whose innovative approach to children’s health education is having an impact in hospitals around the world.

Explain Away the Fear

Esther Wang wanted to design a product that would answer this specific need expressed by hospitals in Singapore: when kids are brought into hospitals, they are usually scared. She started by immersing herself in hospitals and watching kids interact there.

Her first conclusion what that most of the fear stemmed from a lack of understanding of medical procedures. Children needed more than words and explanations, they needed an experiential approach. She started testing ways children could learn and understand the purpose of their visits. The challenge was to turn healthcare moments into experiential learning.

There was also another issue at hand: when children don’t understand medical procedures, they can feel hostility towards medical staff, or betrayed by their parents.  This needed to change. “Family ties should grow stronger through these experiences,” says Esther, not weaker. Similarly, it’s easier for medical practitioners to work with kids who understand they are all on the same team. They too, need to have a positive relationship with the child, albeit a very different bond.

Rabbit Ray pack

That’s how Rabbit Ray was conceived. Rabbit Ray is more than a blue plastic toy with health-related gadgets: it’s an invitation to play and learn. There’s a whole process of using Rabbit Ray that allows children to go from being passive and scared to willing and active participants in their care. And it’s simple.

How Rabbit Ray Works

Rabbit Ray is a cross between a doll and role play. Essentially, it is a doll: kids immediately reach out to play with the cool looking Rabbit. The sleek bunny opens up to reveal medical instruments which can be used on Ray to explain major medical acts. Vaccination, blood sampling, intravenous drips and more can be experimented directly on Ray. So he is a medical doll which doctors and nurses can use to explain what will happen to the child. They learn by watching medical acts performed on Ray.

The great power of dolls is that they can be used to role play. “When children are put into the position of injecting Rabbit Ray, they get to play the star and the medical person,” says Esther. This can lead to vital interactions. “Telling the child that Rabbit Ray is scared – like he might be -, helps the child empathise with the nurse or doctor.” So that when the child gets the same medical act performed on himself, he will find it easier to cooperate. Cooperating will feel like being part of a team, rather than passively subjecting to a scary event.

Kids playing with Rabbit Ray

Kids playing with Rabbit Ray

Last but not least, Rabbit Ray was designed for a variety of clinical scenarios – from emergency with a high volume of patients, to the quiet moments during a patient’s hospitalization. Explanations can be given in just one minute or turned into a 30-minute game. Moreover, Rabbit Ray is certified according to Europe Safety Standards and strict clinical infection control standards. Ray is easy to wipe down in record time, which helps for fast transitions.

Real Situations Rabbit Ray has Saved the Day

As we’d initially wanted to focus on diabetic kids who need to learn how to perform medical procedures on themselves, Esther talked us through the specifics. “The needle is very realistic, but it’s made out of a tiny straw“, she explained. “This means they can use it as a practice needle on themselves, as they learn to get comfortable.” In essence, children can practice how and where to inject themselves insulin, without the actual scary needle. “Touching the fake needle conveys a lot that words cannot.”

Rabbit Ray is also great for special needs kids. A special needs school in Singapore used Rabbit Ray to explain the upcoming vaccination campaign, and they were thrilled with the results. The children – juniors – were relaxed and happy, many of them even hugged the doll after the shots, and the headmistress intends to use Rabbit Ray all year long to explain health-related subjects. Generally speaking, Rabbit Ray’s multisensory approach could help children affected by conditions ranging from autism to sight loss.

Happy Nurses with their Rabbit Rays

Most often, Rabbit Ray is used 45 hospitals in 11 countries, mostly with children fighting cancer. The bunny is fun and uncomplicated. It helps ensure kids in hospitals stay just that: kids.

Esther Wang and the Joytingle team are recognised globally as the Global Winner of the Shell LiveWIRE Top Ten Innovators Award (2015). Now she hopes she will be able to bring this resolutely humane innovation to more kids all over the world.

Additional Links

Looking for some of our sources? Check them out. And send us more by commenting below: 

  • Rabbit Ray is available on Irisada, here.
  • Rabbit Ray on the web: here 
  • A short TV report by News Channel 7 WJHG.com.
Please follow and like us:

Everyday Strategies for Life with Diabetes

This series is designed to help parents manage specific aspects of bringing up a child with a different learning path. We’ll be looking at what parents, specialists and people with diabetes have to say about living with the condition.

This month we interviewed Laura, who has lived with diabetes for almost 15 years. Diagnosed as a teenager, she is now an accomplished professional. She reflected with us on how her condition has affected her life over the years.

“This Will Not Affect My Life”

Those were the first words she pronounced, after waking up from the coma induced by the onset of diabetes. “At the time, I mostly worried about catching up with the school work I’d missed out on during my hospitalisation,” says Laura, “and making sure my academic future wasn’t compromised.” She was a quick learner and easily understood how to adapt her food intakes and inject insulin. So it seemed that Laura’s life would indeed continue on her terms.

“Looking back, my parents had a very pragmatic approach to my illness.”  The fact that they let her be autonomous while at the same time reading up and becoming as knowledgeable as possible, empowered her to face the difficulties linked to her illness. “This helped cope with the anxiety of having to save my own life on a daily basis,” she says. They were just as good at keeping the right kinds of sugar lying around everywhere, as they were nudging her to make sure she had listed all the medical products she would be needing for an upcoming vacation.

Blood Glucose Meter Diabetic Finger Test Diabetes

Blood Glucose Meter Diabetic Finger Test Diabetes

At the same time, her parents helped her acknowledge that her condition meant she could now be considered handicapped. “I’m not sure I would have filed the paperwork to get an adapted schedule for my official exams,” says Laura, “because at the time I didn’t really want to admit that my diabetes could affect my stress levels, my memory or my concentration.” Transitioning from a “standard” person to a person with “special needs” was a gradual process.

“Don’t Compensate, Do Things Your Own Way”

Laura’s views on her illness have changed over the years. “I used to deal with my handicap by compensating to do things the same way as everyone else,” she says, “which is ultimately very tiring.” She would always want to finish every hike up to the top of the mountain, avoid adapting work hours to her sugar levels, and for the most part, her diabetes could go completely unnoticed.

Today, she has started to see things differently. She no longer wants to focus on the negatives – like the annoying checklists when packing for faraway travel destinations -, or the ideal achievements she should aim for – like the top of that mountain. “I’ve learnt to let go and accept that I’m already achieving so much, that I can derive satisfaction and pride without aiming for impossible goals.”

With this in mind, she sets up her own lifehacks or daily strategies. For example, when it comes to going to the gym, she has adapted her expectations. “After working out, my glucose levels can slump, despite my best efforts to maintain them, which in turn wears me out and induces a lot of stress.” So Laura stopped going at lunchtimes – to keep her afternoons at work productive – or the evening before important morning meetings. “And now I accept that sometimes, simple physical activities wear me out, and that’s fine, even if it’s non-gym related!”

“Education, Communication, Self Acceptance”

Laura has always explained her illness to her friends and colleagues. “Education is key, from the very beginning,” she says. For example, a diabetic child’s teachers and carers need to know what to do in case of an emergency. What’s more, there can be misplaced stigma and judgement around this illness, which can damage a child’s self-esteem.

A child with diabetes. Picture from www.nhs.uk

A child with diabetes. Picture from www.nhs.uk

However, what she didn’t use to speak up about easily, was her physical limits. Of course, people knew that she had to monitor her sugar levels during physically challenging activities. “Now I’ll ask how long I’ll be walking during a seemingly benign excursion around town or to a museum,” she says, “because, to me, it will make a difference if I walk 30 minutes or 3 hours today.” Being more open – and ready to accept these differences – gives her more leeway to adapt her strategies and reach her goals.

Nowadays, using the word “handicap” is important for me,” she says. This hasn’t always been the case, and she’s grateful that her family, friends and colleagues adjust to her shifting identity as a person with special needs. “My feelings about this part of my identity will probably continue to evolve – and that’s fine.

Final Words and Tips
  1. Being able to pitch the illness in relatable terms is very important. “What I’ve learnt, is that people need to know why I’m telling them about my diabetes“, says Laura. “So I try to use engaging language and explain the person’s role.” For example, teachers might need to be able to spot warning signs, employees might need to know you cannot come in earlier than a certain time, etc.
  2. “I’ve often felt guilty when my reading showed my insulin levels were off track,” she notes, “but really, it’s not a mark or a grade.
  3. Tetraderm plasters changed her life (Laura has medical pumps attached to her body 24/7).
  4. When travelling: Laura uses Frio products to keep her meds cool and special boxes to keep used needles. You can check out some cooling bags on Irisada’s site here.

 

Please follow and like us: