New Year, Same Promise, Exciting Developments

The old year is closing, the new one is coming. We thought now would be the right time to reflect on 2017 and give you a taste of what is yet to come. As you know, our goal is to become the go-to platform for families in search of solutions adapted to their developmental differences. We’ll continue to pursue this goal.

happy-new-year

Photo credit: Aaron Burden

2017: Developing Community and Awareness

Those of you who’ve followed us from the beginning know Irisada is still young. As the online platform grew, we also wanted to get to know our community better. So just under two years ago, we opened a Facebook page.  This year we worked on strengthening our community of followers and pursuing socially responsible goals.

We held several fun giveaways, including Hua Hee card games to help fight against dementia and Senseez Pillows for kids with sensory needs. We also held a fundraiser to give back to the community when we launched T-Jacket (a vest that helps autistic children relax by simulating a hug) on Irisada.

banner-03

Part of our aim is also to build awareness around a wide range of conditions and explore the kinds of products and anecdotal tips that help families live fuller lives. Over the past six months, we focused on different conditions, striving to share tips from other parents in similar situations. Here’s a quick recap in case you’ve missed some of them:

2018: Same Promise, Exciting Developments

With already more than 300 products available for a range of conditions and abilities, we’ll be continuing to find the best solutions for your families. We’ll expand product ranges and cater to new conditions, including those linked to mobility and the elderly, to give you more choice.

banner-01

As for our community, we’ll be actively discussing specific points in our specialised Facebook groups. One such group is already running (The Discussion Group for Solutions and Tools for Special Needs), feel free to join, and we welcome suggestions for groups you’d like to see set up.

In terms of blog articles, we’ll be delving deeper into some of the conditions already mentioned, reach out to us if you have specific topic suggestions.

We look forward to the coming year with you. Keep following us on Facebook and Instagram. Get in touch with comments and suggestions. And of course, send us product ideas or reviews. You are the reason Irisada exists, you’re part of our story!

Last but not least: Happy New Year and thanks for following our adventures!

Tips for Travelling with a Wheelchair

This series is designed to help parents manage specific aspects of bringing up a child with a different learning path. We’ve chosen a slight variation this week, as the festive season approaches: travelling with a family member with limited mobility.

The festive season is almost upon us! Off we will go to those end of year get-togethers, where we’ll eat copious meals and of course, give and receive gifts. We will probably spend hours in transport to get there, alongside hundreds of millions of people around the world.  At Irisada, we wondered: how do families with wheelchair users cope?

We spoke with Pascale and Hervé, whose experience of physical disability is relatively recent. Hervé suffered a stroke four years ago and is now hemiplegic, with slowed mobility and frequent wheelchair use.

Ensuring the Destination is Accessible

Pascale is in charge of logistics. Her motto is to always prepare for whatever might go wrong. “Whenever we travel, book a room or even visit friends, my first thought is to understand if Hervé will be comfortable and able to move around. I always look at photos, and often call for more information,” says Pascal. The obvious reason, being to confirm how accessible the destination really is, the second being to limit the unknowns in the equation. “We can’t improvise anymore – unless we already know what might be problematic.”

16769-a-woman-in-a-wheelchair-getting-into-a-shower-or

It’s not always easy to find accessible bathrooms

“When renting, the most important rooms to look at are definitely the bathroom and the bedroom,” she explains. “The bathroom is the scariest place for people who aren’t steady on their feet. Especially when the floor is wet.” So Pascale always makes sure there’s enough space for Hervé to walk around comfortably, or even use his chair if he needs to. They also bring their own material: the invaluable shower stool, a portable shower bench, shower mats and a couple of suction grab bars for the shower.

As for the bedroom, the couple is most vigilant about how the bed is placed in the room. It can’t be too close to the wall, and height can be an issue.  “We recently travelled abroad, and found ourselves confronted with an unusually high bed, which was a big problem.” Hervé wasn’t as autonomous in those conditions, so they’ll be on the watch in the future. As they like to have breakfast in bed and Hervé spends a lot of time reading, they also bring an Invacare Backrest so he can sit up.

Choosing the Right Mode of Transport

So far the couple has tested travelling by car, train and plane. “At first we would only travel by car,” says Pascale, “because we felt more autonomous.” The first few trips were long, perhaps even too long. “I remember once we crossed the border and couldn’t find a place to stop for Hervé to use a bathroom. That was unnecessarily stressful.” They have got better at evaluating how long they can drive without wearing Hervé out. For them, driving is still the most convenient mode of transportation.

alibaba-wheelchair-traveler-branding-in-asia-magazine

Quan Peng’s inspiring travel story has been picked up in China (for more, see links section)

“We’ve only flown once since Hervé’s stroke,” says Pascale, “and it was not a satisfying experience.” The small awkward spaces, lack of adjustable seating and overall poor organisation did not make them eager to fly again. “I suppose we’ll try again in the future, but it will require more organisation.” Meanwhile, taking the train can be either a smooth ride or a bit of a fiasco. “So far”, says Pascale, “the TGV service in France has been amazing, but in the only other country we’ve taken the train, customer service was less than average.”

Making the Most of the Celebration

Once you get to your party or your holiday home and the room is buzzing with chatter, how do you make the most of the celebration? Both mentioned that in his case, he tires faster in noisy environments. Moreover, Hervé prefers to stand than sit in public, which is also physically tiring. “I like to know there’s a quiet place he can retreat to if it becomes too much,” adds Pascale.

One reason Hervé stands is to maintain eye contact and connect more. “When I sit, I prefer people to come down to my level – sit or bend – so I can see their faces,” says Hervé. “But if I’m in my chair, I don’t want my disabilities to become the centre of all my conversations.” Little things count.

Generally speaking, Hervé is conscious that his social interactions are still distorted by his handicap. “Sometimes people want to give me a hand, but they don’t know how, and that can stress me out,” he says. If a friend or stranger tries to help by holding his immobile side, they will unbalance Hervé. “It’s difficult to ask someone not to help you, or to do it some other way.” Similarly, he needs to draw a line. “Often I’ll say that I don’t need assistance with a certain task because otherwise, I’ll regress!”

And in the end, surrounded by family and friends, his stress and preoccupations evaporate. Good food, loving people and fun gifts have a way of doing that.

Additional Links

Looking for some of our sources? Here are a few we browed on the web. You can send us more by commenting below:

Turning Hospital Fears into Positive Experiences

This series is designed to help parents manage specific aspects of bringing up a child with a different learning path. We’ll be looking at what parents, specialists and people with diabetes have to say about living with the condition.

We’d initially planned to cover the difficulties faced by diabetic children learning how to use needles on a daily basis. But kids with many conditions face a common fear of medical setting. So we spoke to Esther Wang, an entrepreneur and inventor, whose innovative approach to children’s health education is having an impact in hospitals around the world.

Explain Away the Fear

Esther Wang wanted to design a product that would answer this specific need expressed by hospitals in Singapore: when kids are brought into hospitals, they are usually scared. She started by immersing herself in hospitals and watching kids interact there.

Her first conclusion what that most of the fear stemmed from a lack of understanding of medical procedures. Children needed more than words and explanations, they needed an experiential approach. She started testing ways children could learn and understand the purpose of their visits. The challenge was to turn healthcare moments into experiential learning.

There was also another issue at hand: when children don’t understand medical procedures, they can feel hostility towards medical staff, or betrayed by their parents.  This needed to change. “Family ties should grow stronger through these experiences,” says Esther, not weaker. Similarly, it’s easier for medical practitioners to work with kids who understand they are all on the same team. They too, need to have a positive relationship with the child, albeit a very different bond.

Rabbit Ray pack

That’s how Rabbit Ray was conceived. Rabbit Ray is more than a blue plastic toy with health-related gadgets: it’s an invitation to play and learn. There’s a whole process of using Rabbit Ray that allows children to go from being passive and scared to willing and active participants in their care. And it’s simple.

How Rabbit Ray Works

Rabbit Ray is a cross between a doll and role play. Essentially, it is a doll: kids immediately reach out to play with the cool looking Rabbit. The sleek bunny opens up to reveal medical instruments which can be used on Ray to explain major medical acts. Vaccination, blood sampling, intravenous drips and more can be experimented directly on Ray. So he is a medical doll which doctors and nurses can use to explain what will happen to the child. They learn by watching medical acts performed on Ray.

The great power of dolls is that they can be used to role play. “When children are put into the position of injecting Rabbit Ray, they get to play the star and the medical person,” says Esther. This can lead to vital interactions. “Telling the child that Rabbit Ray is scared – like he might be -, helps the child empathise with the nurse or doctor.” So that when the child gets the same medical act performed on himself, he will find it easier to cooperate. Cooperating will feel like being part of a team, rather than passively subjecting to a scary event.

Kids playing with Rabbit Ray

Kids playing with Rabbit Ray

Last but not least, Rabbit Ray was designed for a variety of clinical scenarios – from emergency with a high volume of patients, to the quiet moments during a patient’s hospitalization. Explanations can be given in just one minute or turned into a 30-minute game. Moreover, Rabbit Ray is certified according to Europe Safety Standards and strict clinical infection control standards. Ray is easy to wipe down in record time, which helps for fast transitions.

Real Situations Rabbit Ray has Saved the Day

As we’d initially wanted to focus on diabetic kids who need to learn how to perform medical procedures on themselves, Esther talked us through the specifics. “The needle is very realistic, but it’s made out of a tiny straw“, she explained. “This means they can use it as a practice needle on themselves, as they learn to get comfortable.” In essence, children can practice how and where to inject themselves insulin, without the actual scary needle. “Touching the fake needle conveys a lot that words cannot.”

Rabbit Ray is also great for special needs kids. A special needs school in Singapore used Rabbit Ray to explain the upcoming vaccination campaign, and they were thrilled with the results. The children – juniors – were relaxed and happy, many of them even hugged the doll after the shots, and the headmistress intends to use Rabbit Ray all year long to explain health-related subjects. Generally speaking, Rabbit Ray’s multisensory approach could help children affected by conditions ranging from autism to sight loss.

Happy Nurses with their Rabbit Rays

Most often, Rabbit Ray is used 45 hospitals in 11 countries, mostly with children fighting cancer. The bunny is fun and uncomplicated. It helps ensure kids in hospitals stay just that: kids.

Esther Wang and the Joytingle team are recognised globally as the Global Winner of the Shell LiveWIRE Top Ten Innovators Award (2015). Now she hopes she will be able to bring this resolutely humane innovation to more kids all over the world.

Additional Links

Looking for some of our sources? Check them out. And send us more by commenting below: 

  • Rabbit Ray is available on Irisada, here.
  • Rabbit Ray on the web: here 
  • A short TV report by News Channel 7 WJHG.com.