Funding Campaign – The Interstellar Board Game for the Blind

Every month we focus on parents bringing up a child with a different learning path. This month we’ll be looking at what parents and specialists have to say on raising children who are blind or have conditions related to vision impairments.

October 12th is International Sight Day, so at Irisada, we thought it would be a great month to highlight cool products and causes around blindness. We’re kicking off the October with a very special fundraising campaign to support Interstellar Fantasy Flight, a unique board game designed especially for blind kids. I interviewed the creator and designer of the game, Annie (佳芝), to learn more.

Stage 1: Early Years and The Realisation  

20901654_2071918266363334_2670588857863537285_oAnnie is currently a PhD student at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, majoring in Design. “I first got involved with blind children and their families in high school”, she says. “After I started volunteering, I gradually came to understand how being blind affected their lives and education.” She realised that blind children are missing out a seemingly small aspect of childhood: board games.

Yet from an educational and social point of view, they were losing much more than just the opportunity to play. As we’ve mentioned again and again and again, play is an integral part of learning. So Annie started applying her design knowledge to their specific needs. First she made a dice with bold braille numbers, which turned out well.

Then she realised that she could make a whole new game from scratch. So she set about creating something new, with two objectives in mind: 1) fun, of course, and 2) helping children acquire new skills. “At first I wondered if we should focus on the fun aspect, but their passion for knowledge touched us, and gave us the motivation to improve their education.”

Stage 2: Designing Interstellar Fantasy Flight 

Annie started working on a concept game to help blind children develop numerical skills: counting, adding, subtracting and other basic maths. “Contrary to seeing kids, they have less opportunity to familiarise themselves with these concepts, and more importantly, they can only access them through touching,” she says.

A brand new game was born: Interstellar Fantasy Flight

A brand new game was born: Interstellar Fantasy Flight

At the same time, Annie wanted the game to be social and inclusive. “We designed the game to be played with their parents and their seeing friends”, she says, “so that it creates a social moment all together.” It’s also based on a theme that all children can relate to, interspace and spaceships, which gets their imagination fired up, and is very cool to them.

So now you’re wondering: how does it work? The aim of the game is to build a space craft. To do so, each player needs to collect a certain number of ores, which are represented by different shaped pieces (round, square, pentagon etc.). To get each piece, they need to randomly pick a ball from a jar. The balls have numbers on them (in braille) and the kids then perform basic maths problems. Players take turns, and the first player to complete their space ship wins.

A glimpse of the space ships and ores

A glimpse of the spaceships and ores

“It took about eight months to make and test the game. We’ve tested it multiple times and about 30 people (seeing, blind, adult or child) have already played” Annie reflects. The tests take place in two Taiwanese schools for the visually impaired and so far the feedback from children and parents is very positive.

Stage 3: Production and Distribution

Interstellar Fantasy Flight is now ready to be produced and distributed. This is where Irisada and our readers come into play. We at Irisada are always on the look out for products that will appeal to children with different learning needs, and this game stood out.

We’ve teamed up with Annie to help her raise funds to pay for the first batch of production and to give the game to specialised schools and institutions in Taiwan. The game is also available to pre-order on our site. If you’d like to lend a hand, you can access the crowdfunding campaign here, and if you’d like to have your own game, you can pre-order it here.

Sports for Kids with Hearing Loss: Keys to Success

This series is designed to help parents manage specific aspects of bringing up a child with a different learning path. This month we’ll be looking at what parents and specialists have to say on raising children who are deaf or are hard-of-hearing. The previous article in this series can be found here.

“Deaf kids can do anything but hear well”

But apparently some with aided hearing do hear amazingly more than a regular hearing person. But we digress. When we asked Bianca Birdsey, a medical doctor and mother to deaf twins, about extracurricular activities she immediately enumerated her kid’s hobbies. Her children really can do anything: from karate to dancing, including team sports, they are busy!

Duck-hee Lee is an South Korean Teenage tennis sensation

Duck-hee Lee is a deaf South Korean Teenage tennis sensation

Tips for helping kids do sport fall under two main categories. On the one hand, adapting social behaviour and communication patterns, and on the other, finding equipment and technical adjustments. Furthermore, “the challenge is more around socialising,” says Bianca, “especially if people see implants or aids and assume they won’t need to accommodate.”

Adjusting to Deaf or Hard of Hearing Team Members

Listening to Bianca talk about her experience, it seems that many of the adjustments are minor. For example, Bianca explains to coaches that her children will need more eye contact, and lips should not be hidden. These adjustments meet the child halfway, as she learns how to adapt too. As a result, her kids have developed “special powers”, and she marvels at how they can now lip read backwards in a mirror during ballet class.

Tamika Catchings was the star player of the Indiana Fever WNBA team and an Olympic gold medalist. Image courtesy of lovewomensbasketball.com

Tamika Catchings was the star player of the Indiana Fever WNBA team and an Olympic gold medalist.

A good way to make the sports environment more inclusive is to teach coaches, teachers and fellow team members a few words in sign language. Involving the team, by giving them 10 new signs is a great way for them to bond. What’s more, we suspect being able to sign a little might even give them an edge over competitors if they want to share secret information during a match!

Use these Adjustments to teach your Child to Advocate for Themselves

Bianca is very aware that her children will need to learn to advocate for themselves in the future. “What’s important for me is their confidence,” she says, “and I want to model how to advocate in a nice, calm way.” In this respect, a sports environment is a great place for children with hearing loss to realise that asking for accommodations is normal.

In rare instances where coaches put up resistance, Bianca wants her children to see that they are worth fighting for. More than just sports, her children need to know “they are loved unconditionally,” and should not take no for an answer when it comes to their social needs.

Equipment and Technical Adaptations

In some cases, technical gear might be required. Swimming comes to mind, as kids with implants might have a difficult time keeping them dry. Solutions do exist, like the ListenLid Swim Cap, so these children can develop their full athletic potential. In other sports, bigger helmets might be the answer, as well as headbands to hold aids and implants in place. We even saw some creative braiding while surfing for ideas, by the mother of a very athletic teenager.

Terrence Parkin is a deaf olympian swimmer

Terrence Parkin is a deaf Olympic medal winning swimmer

Sometimes technical adaptations are easy for schools and training centres. For example, the dance school Bianca’s children attend turns the base to the floor so they can feel the beats. We bet the experience is also enriching for the hearing kids, who are getting a different approach to dancing.

All Worth the Effort…

Most of all, Bianca is really proud of her dancing deaf children. “They absolutely love their dance concerts, they seem confident and happy. And they have the biggest smiles!” she says. Which goes to show deaf children really can – and should – do anything.

Additional Links

Some additional links for parents looking for more information. Please also suggest more to us, which we can add to the list.

 Final Takeaway

deaf-champions2

 

Photo credits: Duck-hee Lee (L’Equipe), Tamika Catchings (lovewomensbasketball.com), Terrence Parkin (Michael Steele/Allsport/Getty)